IABD EXPERIENCE

The last week of January I was fortunate to the attend the International Association of Blacks in Dance conference in Dayton, Ohio. The conference consisted of masterclasses, panel discussions, and performances ranging from middle school students to professional companies. Myself and three of my colleagues presented a panel called ‘Schoolin’ Life,’ a discussion about navigating Graduate School at predominately white institutions (PWI). We each spoke about our individual research goals and past and present projects. Individuals in the audience asked us questions allowing us to share our personal encounters to give context to the life of Black Graduate students at a PWI. I was grateful to be able to share and give advice to people of color who want to join the community of Black scholars.

Also while attending the conference myself and several BFA students performed in the collegiate concert. It was exciting to be dancing for a theatre full of people supporting and cheering you on the entire piece. This performance opportunity was also a chance for me to be the rehearsal director for the work, while also creating a deeper sense of community between myself and the undergraduate students.

Overall, attending IABD filled me mentally, spiritually, and physically. Interacting, networking, and performing with my Black family in dance encouraged and strengthened my love for this beautiful art form. I’m excited to visit this conference for many years to come.

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The Big 5-OH

Over the course of two weekends and eight shows, I was a part of the 50th Anniversary concert for the department of dance at The Ohio State University. It was such a pleasure to be immersed in the rich history and culture of this department I’m now included in. The concert was divided into fours works depicting the elements of space, flow, time, and weight. The work I performed in not only pushed me physically, but mentally and emotionally as well. The movement was vigorous and required attention to rhythms and the connection between the ensemble. But simultaneously, she was challenging our mental capacity of linking ourselves individually and as a collective to the lineage of the department. Even though this is only my first semester at OSU, I feel a strong attachment to those who came before me. Taking time during rehearsal to look at archival materials and see the work we are making now is built upon the principles and values of those that came before us was satisfying and enjoyable.

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Local Dance Showcase

Last night I had the pleasure of attending a lecture/performance demonstration at the Lincoln Theatre. Assistant Professors Crystal Michelle Perkins and Dr. Nyama McCarthy-Brown gave us an inside look into their research areas and the influences of identity, life experiences, spirituality, community involvement, and race interact with their creative and scholarship practices. The night began with both women performing a small duet together. Seeing them both perform in their movement styles allowed me to see a new layer of them that isn’t always seen in the classroom/studio setting. Both women moved with grace and drew me into the intimate duet.

After the duet finished Dr. McCarthy-Brown showed a small video about the creative work she does with her son that speaks to the themes of being a single Black mother raising a Black son. Her work focuses closely on her relationship with her son and the exploration his life growing up as a Black man in America. The scholarship side of Dr. McCarthy-Brown’s research is about inclusive pedagogy for a diverse world. She read an excerpt from her book speaking to the personal experiences she faced in the dance studio and how they shaped her outlook to learning dance. I thoroughly enjoyed how open and vulnerable she made herself in order to speak on these topics. In my opinion, someone showing that they have dealt with certain problems makes it easier for others to connect with them. Dr. McCarthy-Brown allowed us into her life experiences and creative process so we could understand the intentions and meanings behind her research.

IMG_2820Next Professor Perkins presented two excerpts of choreographic work she created for Dayton Contemporary Dance Company. Along with video presentations of the work, she had two company members demonstrate some of the movement to give us background information on specific gestures, hand positions, and musical choices. I’ve been working with Professor Perkins this semester for the 50th Anniversary Dance Concert at The Ohio State University, so we’ve conversed about some of the African diaspora influences in her work. However, being able to see the physical representations of it through the company members and the films shown I was able to clearly see those references and how they all work together.

Overall, I enjoyed attending this lecture/performance demonstration. This showcase allowed me to visually see the creative and academic work that my professors are making. This experience has built upon my idea of research and all the possibilities within it. Research isn’t just limited to academic writing, it involves choreographic works, film-making, community outreach, and so much more. The many choices and paths that can be taken in the world of dance makes me love it even the more.